Deepin 15.11 Vs Ubuntu 18.04 LTS | Is Deepin stealing your personal data?

Deepin 15.11 Vs Ubuntu 18.04 LTS | Is Deepin stealing your personal data?


Deepin is futuristic looking Linux distro
which ships with its own desktop environment and a host of homegrown applications. Deepin
is a very different take on desktop Linux, right from it’s philosophy to the way it operates.
It is a Debian based Linux distro and in this video, we’ll be comparing it side by side
with another amazing Debian based Linux distro, Ubuntu 18.04. I’ve been playing around with Deepin 15.11
for some days now. I installed it on my PC and I’m using it as my daily driver and very
honestly, it really is very different from a majority of Linux distro. It provides a
very unique user experience. So here, we’ll see how it compares to Ubuntu
in terms of performance, stability, looks and feel, the user experience and gaming.
Finally, In the last section, I’ll talk about the whole Deepin’s user data collection scandal
that happened some time ago. It being based in China, and my personal opinion about it. This is LinuxTex. Let’s do this. Jumping in, let’s begin with the user interface. Deepin Linux comes with its homegrown Deepin
Desktop Environment or DDE for short. DDE is built using the Qt framework, the same
as KDE. First impression. It looks stunning. The semi-transparent elements, the side panel,
the workflow of the desktop, it’s all really good. The desktop here utilizes the limitless
capabilities of the Qt framework and creates a desktop that is, just so good to look at. The desktop has 2 modes, a fashion mode which
looks like MacOS. And an efficient mode which looks like the good old windows 7, but with
more glitter. The application launcher too has 2 modes.
A fullscreen one, and a better one. Now let’s talk about this side panel. Putting
the quick settings and the notifications here is fine. But putting all the settings here
is not cool. Look at this and tell me it’s not crowded. Hey man, You really need to provide
a dedicated application for settings if you’re gonna develop a Linux distro. For someone like me who pays a lot of attention
to details, the rendering of the desktop feels subpar at times. You probably can’t see it
here in the video, but the font rendering needs some work. Especially in the application
menu. It feels a bit crowded with items too close together and bad fonts. But inside the
applications, the fonts render just fine. Installing the proprietary NVIDIA drivers
does improve things. To sum things up, the design is great, the
animations and effects look good and the Deepin looks really gorgeous on smaller screens but
the same cannot be said of larger and high resolution and hidpi screens. I really hope
they work on it because I see a lot of potential in Deepin. There is a good set of gorgeous wallpapers. To sum things up, in the looks department,
Deepin shines with some shortcomings here and there, which you won’t even notice on
smaller screens like laptops. The layout is really good and special focus has been given
to make the desktop feel premium. Now moving on to Ubuntu 18.04, we get a modified
GNOME desktop here. The design layout and the workflow is completely
different from what we get in Deepin. The elements are bigger. The way you search
and open applications when your multitasking, can feel more intrusive compared to Deepin
desktop, but once You get the hang of it, the workflow speeds up considerably. Pressing the windows or the super button brings
up both the search as well as an overview of running applications. Once you get the
hang of switching applications like this, the whole thing can be really powerful. On GNOME, the search is really something.
You can set up what all things you can search from here. So although a bit intrusive, the
whole GNOME workflow has a lot of potential once you get used to it. It might not be for
everybody, but it does work. The Yaru theme of Ubuntu is really good and
has a weight to it. It makes the applications look nice and superior. And if you want to
personalize your desktop, Ubuntu provides more options and is very flexible as far as
customization goes. There’s are a lot of awesome GTK themes available for the GNOME desktop. The animations and transitions are smooth
and swift. The colors pop out and the application icons
look beautiful on the side launcher. I like the fonts better here. Side by side, Ubuntu’s GNOME desktop feels
a lot more mature than Deepin desktop environment. Because IT IS. I’m a huge fan of the Windows 7 style desktop
layout so I really like what Deepin has to offer. It builds on the same blueprint but
has a modern touch to it. GNOME, on the other hand, is more polished.
But both are extremely usable and are something built for today. I liked somethings here and somethings there.
As I always say, beauty is a rather subjective issue so both Deepin 15.11 and Ubuntu 18.04
get a point each for the user interface. Next, let’s talk about performance. How fast and responsive Deepin and Ubuntu
are compared to each other. Well, Deepin boots up marginally faster than
Ubuntu on my older laptop. Deepin desktop uses slightly lesser resources
than Ubuntu, and at times feels more responsive in opening applications.
Of course, you won’t notice a performance difference when performing larger tasks like
compressing huge files or compiling something. And even on moderately powered devices, the
performance gap between both the distros completely vanishes. Deepin desktop is built using Qt and KDE which
is very efficient. Computers get more powerful every year.
GNOME has been evolving to utilize this surge in computational power. So to sum up the performance section, Deepin
is slightly more responsive ONLY on older hardware. Now you won’t get mind-blowing fps
on games. The speedup is the result of Deepin desktop being more lighter. So I’ll share
the performance point between Deepin and Ubuntu. Both Ubuntu and Deepin are based on Debian.
So they both are stability focused Linux distros and provide and dependable computing experience.
Deepin has provided almost 5 years of support with its 15 point version and Ubuntu now provides
5 years + 5 years that is a total of 10 years on LTS versions. You can use both Deepin and Ubuntu for schools,
colleges, offices, your projects and stuff. They both are dependable. No doubt here. But Deepin, considerably, has more bugs than
Ubuntu, specifically when updating and installing critical packages like drivers. For me, Deepin
has failed to boot after major updates on multiple occasions. Ubuntu too had this issue
but it was long ago. Now Ubuntu has matured enough and its updates are usually very smooth. In other aspects, Both the distros are bug-free
and everything works. Ubuntu has always been preloaded on laptops by dell, now Huawei has
started selling laptops with Deepin preinstalled on them. That’s a good sign of the dependability
and the usability of a Linux distro. Deepin fetches software from Debian repositories
which contain more than 50000 stable, tested packages. Ubuntu too has a large software
repository. Almost all the software vendors who cater
to Linux create a .deb package for Ubuntu and Debian. They all officially support Ubuntu.
So Debian based Linux distros give you a very high quality of software availability. And if any software is not available in the
official repositories, they are provided through PPAs, which are maintained by the software
creators or the maintainers themselves. Both these distros allow you to install software
in a fast, convenient and secure way. Software availability and the general ease of installing
software on both Deepin and Ubuntu is top grade. Top points for them. Steam and steam games can be installed on
both Deepin and Ubuntu. Now using Steam’s proton feature, you can install and run a
good number of windows exclusive games here, that too without any installation and configuration
hassle. You can also get non-steam games from the
app stores in both the distros. There are good number of amazing, free games here. The quality of gaming in terms of FPS is similar
on both the operating systems. I’d like to remind you that Steam officially
supports Ubuntu, which means all the games will be tested and optimized for Ubuntu. So the gaming point goes to Ubuntu There is a decent amount of help regarding
Deepin available online. Troubleshooting guides and solutions are available and if you don’t
find something, you can google as to how to solve that issue on Debian and apply the same
solution to Deepin. Compared to that, Ubuntu has exhaustive, detailed
and accessible info out there. You can find troubleshooting guides, answers to your questions,
how-to articles and anything else you might need in the Ask ubuntu and ubuntu forums.
What more? All the information there is provided in a
simple, beginner-friendly format with actionable steps. So the community support point goes to Ubuntu. Many of you have asked me why I don’t talk
about Deepin Linux. That’s because last year, Deepin had somewhat of a scandal. It was found
that Deepin Linux was sending encrypted data to a Chinese analytics company. I know talking about scandals is a great way
to attract viewers. But I’m concerned only with providing valuable
content to my viewers that you find useful. So let’s take a look at everything that happened
last year from a purely factual point of view. 1. Deepin’s AppStore is basically a website
and it sends back some info like the browser agent, resolution of your screen, etc, which
of course is collected by every website. In fact, far more information is collected by
most websites you visit. The data sent back was encrypted so it could
be more than that. But in my personal opinion, it was not. So some people detected that Deepin was connecting
to CNZZ server, which is a pretty big analytics site in China. And this was blown out of proportion. Linux blogs, Linux news sites blew this to
a whole new level and presented it to people in a scary way. And it was received badly. I mean the words “sending personal data to
a Chinese server”, would scare even me. 2. Ubuntu sends your search queries to Amazon.
It has started some data collection some time ago. It was strictly analytical data like
hardware model and such. But it did so by informing clearly, in big bold letters when
you first booted the OS. And it also gave a clear choice to deny to send our data. It still received backlash from the community. The thing is, we Linux users have a very high
expectation when it comes to privacy. If we did not, we’d use some other operating system. Now Deepin collected info, without the user
consenting, and without the user knowing about it. It’s the original sin in the FOSS world.
The bigger sin here was using a website as the backend for app center. Data collection rules for an operating system
and for a website are completely different. For example, I’d be ok with a website asking
for my location, it would get my location using my IP address anyway. But I wouldn’t
allow my operating system to access my location. All this escalated and it resulted in Deepin
Linux being called a spyware. Now, do I really think Deepin is a spyware?
No. I personally don’t think Deepin is a spyware. It’s a respected distro that made a mistake. Do I know this for a fact?
I haven’t audited the Deepin source code. So I can’t be a 100% sure. But Deepin has
even put out a notice on its website clarifying things. Now Huawei, which is a huge company,
is selling laptops with Deepin preloaded on them. I’m sure they have done their research.
I know Huawei has it’s own privacy fiasco going on, but I’m not gonna talk about that
here. Ultimately it’s your decision what you want
to download and install on your computer. My winner for today is Ubuntu 18.04. Next, checkout my countdown of 6 best Linux
distros for students. If you liked this video, do consider subscribing
to my channel and also hit the bell icon. This is Linux Tex, signing out.