How to Become a Linux Administrator

How to Become a Linux Administrator


Can you explain to me how to become a Linux
administrator? I might say to start by getting a computer
that has Linux installed on it and learning about the operating system. I’m already ahead of you. In theory, having a Linux box with admin rights
makes you a Linux administrator. I want something I can put on my resume, not
just have bragging rights as a Linux fan on online forums. Practicing installing software and configuring
it. Take the time to understand how to install and upgrade Linux systems. What else would a Linux admin need to know,
aside from the fact that Linux has that little penguin logo? To learn how to properly manage a Linux box,
read a lot of literature on Unix before deploying a Linux distribution you can practice with. I’ve already gotten the advice to read Linux
magazines and books. Is it any better to say I read the blogs instead? To be taken seriously as a Linux administrator,
you have to know how to use VNC, SSH, tar, lists, system log files. You have to be able
to manage kernel run-time parameters, virtual machines and networks. That does sound like system admin work. You’ll have to manage NTP, FTP and HTTP
servers. And a partridge in a pear tree. No, fruit based references are pretty much
just Apple. You need to be able to configure Apache and any thing else they want on the
server as well as use cron jobs and bash scripts. I thought people bashed Bash because of the
security hole found in it in 2014. That was newsworthy because Bash had not had
any known holes before that, whereas Java updates at least once a year due to a security
hole. Oh, you should learn about shell scripting. I hope I can come out of my shell to ask questions
about it. There are plenty of how to resources from
StackOverflow dot com to online how to instruction sets. Learn how to use VI, since this is critical
to log analysis. I’m imagining that applies to user login
logs. And security logs. You need to learn how to
use MySQL command line tools effectively, even more so if the server actually has a
MySQL database on it. I’d rather learn Oracle, since that skill
set pays more. Only because Oracle is licensed and charges
for a lot of the training in how to use it. MySQL is free and growing in popularity because
it is free. I suppose that is your two cents worth on
the topic. Consider it a free open source opinion. If
you want to become a Linux admin, learn the basics through reading ebooks, real books
and online resources. That gives me a good basic understanding,
but managers may not trust it. Then you can consider going to the Linux Professional
Institute and taking the LPIC1 test to prove you know the basics about administering a
Linux box. The alternative is setting up the servers on a cheap contract basis.