How to Dual Boot Ubuntu 18.04 and Windows 10 [2019]

How to Dual Boot Ubuntu 18.04 and Windows 10 [2019]


Hello, Linux users! I’m Abhishek from It’s
FOSS and I’m going to show you How to dual boot Ubuntu with Windows 10 Dual boot means you can opt to login into Ubuntu or Windows when you start
your system. Let’s look at what you need for this tutorial? You need a computer
pre-installed with Windows 10, a good internet connection so that you can
download software, you should back up your Windows data to an external drive, And if you have a Windows 10 live USB or a boot repair desk, it will be helpful, if in case,
things go wrong. And, of course, a USB disk with capacity more than 2 GB. So, the first thing you need to do is download Ubuntu ISO. Google it and from the
Ubuntu website, go to the desktop and there you’ll see the latest
LTS system. It’s shows 16.04 (on the website) but it will be the same for 18.04, 17.10 and 18.10 or 20.04. Go ahead and download it and then we will use a tool called etcher to make live USB. Go to its website, click on download, and then just wait for the
download to finish. While we wait for the download to finish, plug in your USB and format it. A quick format to FAT32 filesystem is
important to create a live USB. Just wait for a couple of seconds and
you will have your format complete. While things are being downloaded, let’s do something else. Let’s make some free space on your windows install On this free space, you will be installing Linux. How much space you should be
allotted to Linux, it’s completely up to you. It could be anything from 30 GB to
300 GB depending upon your system capacity. In my case, I have 223 GB of
of harddisk for windows here and I’ll be making some free space from this
Windows installation itself. I can use a maximum of 147 GB but I’m not going to use all of it, because I might have to use Windows as well. And Windows will take
some space as well. So,100 GB is what I’m thinking of allotting to Linux. So, I’ll have
40GB of extra space for Windows and around 98-99 GB for Linux. A couple of seconds later, I have unallocated free space created.
We’ll leave it like this here. And now, we are going to create the live USB. I hope, by now, your download is complete. If not, you can wait for it. Meanwhile, you can install Etcher, of course. It’s like installing any
other standard Windows software. Just a couple of clicks and it will be
installed. So, Etcher icon has appeared on my desktop. I’m going to just double
click on it, to start the application. I have already plugged in my USB. In my case, the windows ISO has been downloaded. Bionic desktop AMD64. I will put the ISO image here. It automatically detects the USB drive. Now, all you have to do is click on flash. It will take couple of minutes. Normally, it takes 2-3 minutes to
create the light USB. For your comfort, I’m going to speed up the process, so that you don’t get bored just waiting for the USB to be flashed with the ISO image. A couple of minutes later, you will have the live USB ready. Now, what you have to do is restart your system. And when you are at
the boot screen, press F10 or F12 keep on pressing it to go into the boot menu and then boot from your USB. And now, you should see a grub screen with an option ‘Try Ubuntu without installing’, choose this option, so that you can be boot into the live-in environment. This is the way to test Ubuntu or you can install Ubuntu from here. Just click on the ‘Install Ubuntu’ option on the desktop and start the process. The process is quite simple. Except for one step, which we will see in a moment. For the option, ‘Download the updates while installing’, I don’t prefer it because it’s sometimes
creates problems. Now, we have two option. Either we can install Ubuntu
alongside Windows boot manager, we choose that and let Ubuntu handle everything
on its own or we create a manual partition for root, swap and home directories, in
‘Something Else’ option. The simplest option, if you are afraid of manual partition, is to let Ubuntu handle it. If you see that option, just go for it. If you’re a beginner it’s good enough for you. Ubuntu will automatically create
everything for you. You don’t get to choose how much space you want to allot, but that’s not your concern for the moment. But, if you are an
intermediate user or if you want more control, go for ‘Something Else’ option and
create the partitions manually. So, you’ll be seeing the free space which we created in windows and then click on this plus sign to create some
partitions here. in my case, I’ll be giving around 20 GB of space to root.
Root is the directory where all your software’s will be installed. I’m
going do it and the partition field should be logical. I created a root
partition of space 20GB. I have 85 GB of space remaining and I’ll be creating a
swap partition now. The thing is, it’s, kind of, debatable how much space
you should be using. So just to be on the safe side, use half of the RAM size as space or
you can choose another size as well. You can find a good link in the
description for this process and finally, we’ll be creating the home
partition with the rest of the free space available. That’s it! We have root, swap,
and home partitions created Just click on install now and then
it will be warning you for the format and all but your windows data is safe. Don’t worry! So next, it’s pretty straightforward from both options you
will be coming to this screen and it’s very straightforward from here.
Just choose a username and a password for logging into the newly
created operating system here so choose a good password and of course, choose
‘Require the password to log in’ so that you won’t forget your password And it will take a few minutes to install. But it doesn’t take long. It’s quicker than of a typical Windows upgrade and takes like 7-8 minutes or something like that, or even less, I think. So, I will speed up the process
so that you don’t get bored to death here. And it’s like the battle you
have ‘almost’ won! Because you have finally installed it. Just remove the USB and
press ENTER and then you will see the magical grub screen where you will see
the option to boot into Windows and Ubuntu both. Choose Ubuntu for Ubuntu and
Windows boot manager for Windows. I hope that you were successful in
installing Ubuntu and Windows on the same system. If you liked the tutorial,
and find it helpful give it a thumbs up, Stay subscribed for more Ubuntu and Linux tutorials! See you in the next video. Bye Bye!