How to make Windows 7 LIGHTER for gaming!

How to make Windows 7 LIGHTER for gaming!


So, on my video exploring how to remove unnecessary
stuff from the awfully bloated Windows 10 to make it lighter for low spec PCs there
are two responses that I saw very frequently. Number 1 was… just install Linux. Look, fellas, I am all for ideologically supporting Linux
for gaming and I am glad of how good it is getting but while you can do it with reasonable
performance on Nvidia or newer AMD gpus… the IntelHD experience is not very good in
my personal testing. On low-end device, the performance penalty
on IntelHD can be a bit catastrophic… I have heard there are ways to improve this. I am looking into it and would love to make
a video about it. Number 2 was to just use Windows 7 which…
all right. It still gets somewhat updated drivers and
most of the necessary software works there as well as pretty much all of the games but
it is quickly coming to its end of life and now it is not
a very good moment to use an OS that gets no security updates. But if you are committed to using this venerable
version of Windows for gaming for whatever months it has left then sure, it makes sense. After all the background RAM and CPU usage
of this system is much smaller compared to the bloated Windows 10, although just like
newer Windows it can unexpectedly inflate due to background processes, uncontrollable
updates and so. Luckily for you, Windows 7 is significantly
easier to tweak for performance than its younger brother so there is a significant number of
easy to do things to minimize resource usage which can be extremely useful when using a
dual-core or low-end CPU or a combination of small RAM and integrated GPU. Let’s start with… the conventional stuff,
the stuff you have likely heard before with the caveat that this time, it actually makes
a bit of a difference. First one, if you go to control panel, programs,
programs and features and then Turn Windows Features on or Off you get a surprising amount
of control over a lot of background features of the OS. I have disabled most of what is not necessary
for Gaming but before disabling things make a note of how you had it before. Disabling the microsoft .net network might
cause problems on AMD gpus and Tablet PC Components might be a problem if you are using something
with a touch screen but in general functionalities such as Windows Search which tend to use a
lot of background CPU can be disabled. Note: this will disable a lot of included
windows functionality, but that can be replaced by external programs if you need it. If you press the windows key and R and run
msconfig you have a lot of control of the background services and boot programs on these
two tabs, unlike Windows 10 where they were separated in two places. Just like that time, you can easily disable
most of the unnecessary background programs and if you hide the windows services you can
get rid of a lot of services as well. Be aware however that Steam often requires
its service to boot, as will some anti-cheat software. Even within Microsoft service, there is a
number of elements that you can usually safely disable, although as usual make note of its
original state before experimenting. If something malfunctions you know how to
reenable it. And finally, through Control Panel, System
y Security, System, Advanced System Settings and Advances you can disable every visual
effect of the OS so it goes back to looking like good old Windows 98. The effect this has on the performance of
a fullscreen game is very questionable so… your mileage might vary. Let’s talk about the less conventional stuff. While I still very much a fan of the outdated
script that I recommended on my Windows 10 video a large number of people have recommended
TronScript. TronScript is a community maintained a set
of scripts that automate the process of cleaning, disinfecting and debloating Windows 7. The effects of a large part of this script
are arguably lost on a fresh install but its debloating effects are kept updated by the
community and are still very useful It supports anything newer than Windows XP
so you can expect to see in a future Windows 10 debloating video and even though the download
that you can find in the subreddit is a bit large it is self-contained and easy to run. Before that though, I highly recommend you
set up a restore point. I made the same recommendation on the last
Windows 10 video and a lot of people were distraught that the debloating script was
not reversible… that is what the restore point is for! After that running is as easy as extracting
the tron.bat script and resource folder to the desktop and running tron.bat as administrator
and after confirming on the script you let it run… for several hours. No, really, this can take several hours so
make sure to do this when you have time to leave your computer doing its thing. But the result is a reduction in the amount
of background RAM and CPU usage of the operating system. Avoiding CPU usage spikes can be of tremendous
importance when you are using an old or weak CPU with only two cores and playing
a game that maxes CPU, as any spike of usage generated by Windows can translate in unexpected
stuttering. RAM usage follows a similar model. If you are using 8 or more GB of ram and a
dedicated GPU you might likely not notice, but if you are on 4 or less, which is more common that some of you might
believe you are already running into the possibility of running out of memory for some games, add to that an Integrated GPU that must use
part of your ram as VRAM compared to a dedicated GPU which has its own separate VRAM and you
get to a situation were every free megabyte counts and considering that even after debloating it
was rare to see Windows 10 use less than 1 GB this is really good and makes me unhappy
that Windows 7 is going out of support soon. So, as a way of testing the result I put together a test
PC which consists of a Pentium G3260, a cheap Haswell non-hyperthreaded dual-core with 4th
generation Intel Graphics and no dedicated GPU, paired with dual channel 4 GB of RAM
and this setup which someone in the comments is still inevitably going to call too powerful
is going to be running Overwatch. This game is very appropriate for this testing
for several reasons. It is extremely GPU optimized so using the
lowest internal resolution it can usually perform very well on a somewhat modern Intel
HD but its multiplayer team nature often makes its a bit heavier CPU user on the cpu side, and that can struggle on dual cores and Windows 10 with an integrated GPU, it nearly maxes and occasionally overflows
4 GB of RAM. Now, on debloated Windows 7 first with a 30
fps lock the game is capable of running very well. During my entire match, there was only one CPU usage spike that lead
to performance issues and it was in one of the most intense moments of the match. So it is pretty acceptable. Considering how I am used to this game destroying
dual-core CPUs this is a fantastic result. RAM usage likewise is very interesting, at
the most climbing to 3.9 Gb but never quite overflowing, so definitely the debloating
came it handy in the worst moments. If the FPS is unlocked we ran into a more
expected GPU bottleneck, of which optimizing the OS usually does nothing about but even
then it remains surprisingly playable. So, Windows 7. For the time that it has left it remains a
valid and good low-end option where conventional wisdom regarding optimization works and where
are the still methods to debloat it even further. So, make the best of it… while you can. Thank you for watching and thank you to the Ulyas and Failfusion from the LowSpecGamer discord from providing Nitro
to my account. Sorry I forgot to mention you on the last
video.