LGR – Sint Nicolaas – DOS PC Game Review

LGR – Sint Nicolaas – DOS PC Game Review


[Christmas version of LGR Theme plays] [can hiss!] [sips] Ahhh! [typing] Well, it’s December 17th and that means it’s time for some more sexy Dutch lovin’ here on Lazy Game Reviews. [chuckles]
I suppose. And today’s subject of awesomeness is Sint
Nicolaas, a 1998 MS-DOS game by
Netherlands-based Wiering Software. I must admit, as an American, I know next to nothing about
the tradition of Sint Nicolaas. But according to the game’s website, every year Sint Nicolaas makes
the journey from Spain to Holland to deliver presents and
gingerbread cookies to the children. On the night of December 5th, Sint travels over the rooftops and drops presents and cookies through the
chimneys. Sounds an awful lot like the Santa Claus I’m
aware of, and I can only imagine there is an occasional
turf war if both happen to show up at
the same place simultaneously. Or maybe Dutch kids just get double
the presents when that happens. That would be awesome. Whatever the case, the game is based on the Dutch tradition of Sinterklaas and that alone makes it pretty awesome. I’m tired of seeing Santa Claus games. Even more awesome is the fact
that it’s made by Wiering Software, who made a bunch of games. Like this is a bunch of napkins. Yeah, they made a bunch of games. It’s totally the same thing, except not at
all. Never mind. I’m a fan of each of their games, like Charlie the Duck and Super Worms. Sure, most of them tend to be
more than a little bit inspired by Nintendo games like Super
Mario Bros. and Super Mario Kart, But they’ve still got unique twists
and Sint Nicolaas is no exception. The game starts off with a main menu screen allowing you to do things that menus typically allow you to do, mainly. Options, options, and more options. But perhaps most importantly
is the option to read the story, and that is that Sint Nicolaas has been robbed. Frick, what’s with these Christmas characters and terrible home security recently? Anyway, the thieves have taken Sint’s big
sack. But they’re amazingly clumsy and drop
the sack’s contents all over the place. Naturally, it’s up to you to
do the incredibly tedious job– that really should have been
delegated to the authorities– of grabbing all the stolen loot. You start the game off with the Sint himself, some lives, a time limit, no cookies and no score. What a sad state of affairs. The goal is to grab all the gingerbread cookies and presents and return them to the chimney
tops before the night is over. You’ll find these scattered around the level, but keep note of the order in
which you gather the presents. You can only deliver certain presents to certain
houses, which is marked by the color on the chimney. For instance, if a red present
is next in the cue behind you, you have to deliver it to the red house. You can’t skip ahead. You have your standard buttons
for movement, running and jumping. If you don’t like them,
the button layout can be changed and the controls themselves feel quite solid. I have no real complaints here. The graphics are… existent and colorful and well-drawn. And the sound effects are super Nintendo-y, which is pretty cool. [jingle plays] In fact, the whole feel of the game is a bit Super Mario World in its style and… feel. Not too surprising, considering
the other games by these guys. There is no music, though, which is a shame. But whatever, just play some of your
own stuff if you’re really desperate. Another thing that kind of sucks is that if you die by falling off
the roof, running out of time, or hurting yourself too much, then you have to start the entire level over
again. The rage induced by only having one house
left and falling off a rooftop because
of trying to avoid a stupid bird is incredible. Yeah, that’s right. You have these birds flying around. That’s fine in theory. I have nothing against birds. And in fact, some of them even
drop health and cookies for you. An admirable bird occupation if I’ve ever
heard one. But the thing is they also take away your
health. And if you happen to jump on them Mario-style, it actually takes AWAY points. Not only that, but sometimes they’ll steal
the presents or gingerbread. These birds, they just suck, plain and simple. Plus, they make handy extra
platforms at the most opportune times. So I just stomp on their little heads every
chance I get. Sure, if you don’t kill any of them, you get 10,000 points at the end of the level, but screw that! I’m Sint Nicolaas and birds
should fear me, not molest me. Oh, well. If you do fail, and you will, you will at least get a nice worthwhile
ending screen for your trouble. Ha ha. “Sorry children, no presents this year!” Sint Nicolaas got robbed and killed by a little
songbird. Another cool feature is that if
you have two or more minutes left when you finish a level,
you get sent to a bonus level full of lots of tasty gingerbread cookies and precarious platforms that fall apart. Collect 100 cookies without dying and you earn an extra life. Yet another bonus is if you eat
the chocolate letters S-I-N-T in any level, then you get another life. Chocolate equals life in Sint Nicolaas, a fact that I can live with. And… that’s the game. It’s a simple game. A platform game with solid controls, some varying gameplay and stupid birds. Really stupid birds. Not gonna set the gaming world
on fire or anything like that, but for a freeware Christmas game,
I can’t complain one bit. I mean, I could, but I choose not to because I see no real… reason. It’s a perfectly acceptable little arcade
platformer and I like it even if I’m not the most familiar with the Dutch tradition behind it. You can download it or play it
in a browser on its website, which I’ll link to below this video, and there are even a couple
other versions of the game with some gameplay tweaks. I’m not gonna cover them here. They don’t stray too far from this formula. But they’re interesting to take a look at, so go to the Wiering Software website and check these Sint Nicolaas games out. They’re fun and they’re easy to pick up and
play. And they’re Christmasy. At this time of year, what more could you
ask for? [death noise] [dub-step music plays] [MIDI jingle]