The Loop Browser for Mac & Windows | n-Track Studio

The Loop Browser for Mac & Windows | n-Track Studio


Hey guys, Matt Thurtell from n-Track here.
We’re excited to announce that n-Track Studio 9.1 is out now on Desktop and
Mobile & includes a powerful Loop Browser – as well as a large amount of
royalty-free loops & playable instruments. So, we thought it would be
useful for you guys if we produce this video, which is an overview of how to
navigate the Loop Browser, use & import loops – both on desktop, iOS &
Android too. So to open up or close the Loop Browser click either on the Loop
Browser icon in n-Track Studio here or go to the View menu and select Loop
Browser. The Loop Browser will open up and, to get to the main point, either
double-click or click and drag on a loop to import it into your n-Track project.
The first time you do this you’ll get a pop-up that asks if you want to match
the key of the loop to the key of your song project. Select ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ –
we’ll select ‘Yes’ and once imported the loop will match the tempo of your project
automatically and you’re good to start building tracks.
Let’s do a tour of the Loop Browser interface – you can see the main part of
the Loop Browser is split into three columns: Loop Name, BPM, and Instrument
Group. Each of these can be ordered by clicking on the column header – so we can
click on ‘BPM’ for example to see loops in tempo order… down to up
…or up to down. At the top of the Browser there’s a search bar if you know
the name of the specific loop or if you want to quickly generate an
idea by typing in something more general like “guitar”. The waveform of the loop can be viewed
in the lower part of the Browser. This can be played and stopped using the play
and stop buttons on the top right of the waveform. The loop can also be scrolled
through by clicking wherever you want on the waveform. For those of you that
require technical details of loops you can go ahead and hit the ‘i’ button on the
upper left hand side of the waveform. It will allow you to dive more into the
specifics including Sampling Frequency, and Bitrate of a loop – as well as the
Root Key and Loop Tempo. The ‘Follow Song BPM’ icon can be enabled at the lower
right of the Loop Browser – with this icon enabled a loop will automatically match
the n-Track project tempo. This is useful because you can audition sounds and see
if they fit with the song you’re creating, at your songs tempo. In our
example, the tempo of our n-Track project is set at the default of 120bpm.
Let’s hear a loop example with the ‘Follow Song BPM’ icon on playing to 120bpm – our
project tempo – and with it off so the loop plays at its original tempo… and on
again with our n-Track project tempo… and off again. I imagine you can hear the
difference. Let’s continue to look over the Loop Browser interface: ‘All’ gives an
overview of the available loops & audio files, while ‘Type’ classes loops and audio
files into three categories: Loops Instrumentals, and Samples. The ‘Beats’ category is something we’re particularly excited to release because
it means that rappers can get royalty- free release length beats to use and
release instantly – let’s hear an example. We’ve also included the n-Track
sessions used to produce these Beats so that producers can take it one step
further and put their own mark on these instrumentals. They can be located under
the ‘Projects’ folder. To open a Project just double-click on the track name –
clicking once means that you can hear the track before you open the Project as
well. Let’s not save the currently open Project, press play on the new ‘Moving
Mountains’ Project and we can hear that we can solo each part, hear them
individually – and for the producers out there you can amend these Projects to
your taste. Let’s scroll down and click on the ‘Genres’
category – we can see that sounds are categorized into different musical
styles, so let’s have a listen to some ‘Rock’ category examples. ‘Muted Chords Riff’
could easily be the inspiration for a new track. Let’s listen to a drum groove
– nice and up-tempo at 147bpm. Let’s try the ‘World’ category – this could easily be
sampled as part of a rap beat and another example. Moving up we’ll try some
Pop examples – so ‘Club Banger Melody’ sounds exactly that, and let’s try some retro
90s synth. You get the picture I’m sure – the Loop
Browser is packed with hand-selected sounds across the genres to inspire and
enhance your music making. Let’s move down to the ‘Instruments’ category and
listen to a few examples – so we’ve got some lovely ‘Vocal’ sounds and these can
be used royalty-free in your productions. And let’s listen to a synth
example – so that’s a dark texture that you can start a song with easily. Let’s
hear some ‘Keys’ and move on to the ‘BPM’ category. So under the ‘Instruments’
category in the Loop Browser we can click on ‘BPM’ and this organizes every
loop and audio file by its tempo. So we can see this ranges from 184bpm right down
to 54bpm as the slowest tempo and everything in between. One thing to note
is that n-Track supports tempos with decimal points so they don’t always have
to be a whole number, which can sometimes be useful in productions. We’ll listen to
a couple of examples at 80bpm and by enabling the ‘Follow Song BPM’
button we can hear that the loop matches the faster project tempo. Let’s select
another loop – I’m sure you can hear the difference when we deactivate the
button. n-Track offers its own sample packs as free downloads and paid updates
with all available to use royalty-free in n-Track Suite Edition – the individual
packs can be located here in the Add- Manager Section. We can see three text colors:
white means a pack has downloaded and is ready to use; Blue means a pack has already
downloaded but has new updates; Grey means a pack is not yet downloaded and
if we click on an example of this like Drum & Bass Toolkit the Add-on Manager
appears and gives us the option to get the pack. To access the Add-on Manager
we’ll go to the View menu and click on ‘Add-on Manager’. This houses all of the
sample packs and you can see these range across a variety of genres including
Electronic, World, Vocals, Orchestral, Drum & Bass, Rock, Hip Hop and beyond – the
tabs at the top of the Add-on Manager filter which packs include which types
of sound: either Instruments, Drum Kits or Audio Loops. You’ll notice the
buttons next to the sample packs: ‘Remove’ deletes an already downloaded pack; ‘Get’
downloads a new pack that hasn’t been installed; and if a pack has already been
installed but has new changes you will see the ‘Update’ button. Moving on to ‘My
Folders we can bring our own sounds and samples into the n-Track loop browser:
WAVs, mp3s, AIFF, m4a and FLAC audio files can all be imported. Here’s an
example of some drums we’ve recorded as WAVs and imported into the browser. So, to
add your own sounds click on the ‘Add folder’ row, which will open up Finder or
Windows Explorer – locate your sounds and click open. In this case we’re importing
a folder called ‘n-Track Acoustic Collection.’ We can see that this has been
imported as a folder in the Loop Browser and that n-Track recognizes and plays the
WAV files that we’ve imported. ‘Song’ is the final menu option in the
Loop Browser – from this we can see recent files, and in ‘Project Files’ we can
quickly access the loops and sounds used in the n-Track Project right now – so we can see
we’ve got a Clap sound, some Vocal Synths, Kicks and more. There are no files under
the ‘Recent files’ row as nothing new has been added to the Project we opened
earlier from the Beats Projects category. To demonstrate how this works let’s
choose a random loop, 4 on the Door will do. Let’s add it to the project and
returning to the ‘Recent files’ row we can see that 4 on the Door has been added. For this example let’s use Melks
Rollins keys, which we can hear is playing in its original 92bpm in the
new Browser. We’ll import this loop into our n-Track song and we can see the
project is set at 120bpm. We’re hearing that the loop is automatically imported
at 120bpm, matching the speed of our n-Track project. A drop-down menu appears
if you click on the upper right-hand side of a loop – at the bottom part of
this drop-down we can deselect ‘Follow Song BPM’ to return the loop to its
original tempo, within the main n-Track Project. Let’s hear an example of that. We can also re-enable ‘Follow Song BPM’ in
the same way – let’s hear the loop return to the project tempo of 120bpm. Clicking again on the drop-down menu we
can see that above ‘Follow Song BPM’ you can also enable and disable the loop
matching the key of the n-Track project. You can also Pitch Shift the loop
without the need for any plugins, which we think is cool – let’s hear an example
of the Pitch Shift at B4 and B5. The note with the asterisk is the
original key of the loop, so let’s return to that. To give you guys all the options we can
click on the ‘i’ button to go to Part Properties. If the Part Properties
section of the window doesn’t show it’s because you need to actually select the
Part in the n-Track project. We can see that under ‘Musical Info’ we can adjust
the original loop bpm or original loop key, which is quite powerful in itself if
you guys ever deal with metadata. Scrolling down we also have the option
to ‘Follow Song Musical Key’ and ‘Follow Song BPM’ here as well and it’s also worth
mentioning that part speed is automatically labeled on the lower left
part of an audio loop when Follow Song BPM is enabled. Click on the ‘i’ button
again or double-click on the grey area of the part to close Part Properties and
that’s it for this overview part of the Loop Browser. Check out our other videos
on Building a Song using the Loop Browser and any of the sample pack
walkthroughs, all of which are included in n-Track Studio Suite Edition. As ever,
please give this video a Like, Subscribe, Share it and, above everything, just let
us know how you’re getting on with the Loop Browser – we hope you’re having as much
fun with it as we are! Cheers.