The System Won’t Boot. Recover Windows Bootloader with bootrec, fixmbr, fixboot commands 👨‍💻⚕️💻

The System Won’t Boot. Recover Windows Bootloader with bootrec, fixmbr, fixboot commands 👨‍💻⚕️💻


Hello everybody! This video is about recovering Windows 10,
8 and 7 bootloader. Very often users face the problem when the
operating system will not boot, and in most cases it happens because Windows bootloader
is damaged. For example, when trying to start the system
you have errors such as “BOOTMGR is missing,” “An operating system wasn’t found,”
“No bootable device found” and so on. The bootloader can be damaged after installing
another operating system on this computer, trying to use the free space in hidden partitions
or format them, a failure when installing Windows updates or other system problems,
a virus attack etc. Before you start fixing this problem, check
the boot sequence in BIOS or UEFI. It could be the root of the problem with booting
Windows. So, the first method to fix the botloader
will work with all versions of Windows: 10, 8 and 7 (in my case, it is Windows 10). All you need is a recovery disk, or a boot
disk /flash drive of the same bitness as your system (in case of Windows 7, only a boot
disk /flash drive can be used). If you don’t have any, you can use another
computer to create them (you can watch my previous videos to see how to create a boot
flash drive or a recovery disk). After that adjust BIOS or UEFI settings to
boot from a disk / flash drive and enter Windows Recovery Environment. In the recovery environment, click on Troubleshoot
/ Startup Repair (in Windows 7, it is also “Startup Repair”). Select Windows 10 as the target system and
wait for the process to finish. When it does, the computer will restart into
the restored system (don’t forget to change the boot priority to hard disk in BIOS or
UEFI). If you saw a message that restore wasn’t
successful (it’s often the case), try another method. It is also good for Windows 10, 8 and 7. As well as in the first method, go to the
Redovery Environment, click “Troubleshoot” and start Command Prompt. Then enter the command “bootrec /fixmbr”
to rewrite Windows MBR in the system partition of your hard disk. When it is over, we can see the message that
the operation is completed successfully. Using this command is not always enough (for
example, if the bootloader failure was caused by a virus). That is why enter the command “bootrec /fixboot”
to write a new Windows master boot record in the system partition. When it is over, close the command prompt
and boot from the hard disk. Now you are not supposed to have any bootloader
problems. The third method will work with Windows 8
or 10. As I have shown earlier, go to the Command
Prompt started in the Recovery Environment. Enter the command “diskpart” and then
“list volume” to see the number of the hidden partition. If you have UEFI, this partition will have
FAT32 file system and the size of 99-300 Mb, and in case of BIOS, the file system NTFS
and the size of 500 Mb or less. In my case, it is “Volume 3” of 99 Mb
with FAT32 file system. You should also look at the letter of the
drive where Windows is installed (in my case, it is C). After you have seen that, enter the command
“Select volume 3” (that is, you select this partition and work with it), “format
fs=fat32” (that is, format this partition in teh file system it had before), “assign
letter=Y” (assign a letter to the drive; you can choose any letter which is not in
use now), finish the work of Diskpart with the command “Exit” and enter the following
command: “bcdboot C:Windows /s Y: /f ALL” (where С is the system drive letter; Y – is the hidden
partition letter which you assigned) and wait for the process to finish. After the process is complete, we can see
a report saying that boot files have been created successfully. Enter “Diskpart” again, then “select
volume 3” (where 3 is the number of the hidden partition for which you have assigned
the letter), then “remove letter=Y” (that is, delete the letter of this hidden partition,
so that it is not shown in the system) and finish the work of Diskpart again with the
command “Exit.” After that, close the command prompt and restart
the computer (don’t forget to change the boot sequence in BIOS or UEFI to hard disk). Now Windows bootloader should run properly. Thank you for watching and good luck! If you liked this video, click the Like button
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