Top 5 reasons why EVERYONE should try Linux

Top 5 reasons why EVERYONE should try Linux


I’ve spent a good amount of time talking
about Linux on my channel. I primarily use Linux on my computers other
than my Adobe editing & gaming machine. Lots of us “in the know” talk about how
awesome Linux is – but I don’t feel we do a good enough of a job explaining why. I’m EposVox, here to make technology easier
to understand and more fun via free educational videos. In today’s System76-sponsored Linux video,
I’m going to cover some practical reasons to use Linux over Windows, to learn Linux,
or maybe to set your grandmother or child up on Linux instead of Windows. Let’s take a look. My reasons for using Linux comes down to these
5 ideas: Stability and compatibility, security, speed, control and a counter-intuitive ease
of use, and the normally-mentioned reason – cost. Stability and Compatibility
The most important reason that I’d suggest anyone to use Linux is for the stability and
compatibility. Linux will run on just about anything. Do you have a relative with a 10 year old
Windows machine that has slowed to a crawl? You can throw a lightweight distribution of
Linux on it and breathe a whole new life into it! Some Linux distributions can run with as little
as 16 megabytes of RAM, and be installed from a floppy disk. It’s insane. Not only that, but you will very rarely have
to mess with drivers ever again. Drivers for most common hardware are included
in the OS, so as soon as you install you’re up and running without needing to hunt down
drivers or system utilities. I always hate that about setting up new machines. Dedicated graphics cards do have specialized
drivers to get the most out of them for gaming, but those drivers are usually just a click
away, provided by the OS! Not only that, but Linux is essentially the
most stable operating system there is. It is very, very hard to crash your Linux
machine, especially as an average user. Even if you crash a single program, it’s
easy to kill and go about your business without even having to restart! Normal users also can’t do any serious harm
to how the system works without the highest level administrator password. That means if you set up a box for a family
member and make them a normal user, then there’s literally no way for them to brick the machine. You know that horrible “feature” of Windows
where it absolutely 100% forces you to download and install all updates, often even restarting
your computer in the middle of doing something? Or the forced Windows 10 upgrades where people
would wake up one day with a brand new operating system that they didn’t want? Or ever had Windows install an update that
caused the PC to crash or blue screen? Linux users simply laugh at that. No forced updates, no forced upgrades – none
of that with Linux. Hell, you don’t need to update often at
all, and it’s a lot better to take a “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” approach. Your system stays stable. Security
Linux is also configured to be super secure right out of the box. If you’ve ever experienced the sticker shock
of someone trying to sell you on anti-virus and firewall suites for Windows, the free
and built-in or easily accessible tools available on Linux will make you very happy. By default, Linux is set up to be secure from
remote attacks and internal screwing. Like I said before, a normal user can’t
even make system-damaging changes to the computer – they need the administrator, or root, password
to make any significant changes. If someone gained access to your account,
the worst they could do is change your wallpaper. Whoo. Linux is built on the backbone of Unix – a
system designed for many, many users to log into and work on at the same time. Because of this, it’s designed with the
upmost user security in mind. This also makes it perfect for your kids,
too. Not only that, but the vast majority of software
installation and updating will come from the official, verified software sources managed
by the operating system vendor. No viruses or malware there! No trying to download a Java update and winding
up with adware taking over your computer. Lastly, those creating malware and viruses
to get normal people are going to want to target the largest common denominator. In this case, that’s the operating system
– which would be Windows. Speed
Linux is fast. As I said before, lightweight distros of Linux
are perfectly capable of running on some of the oldest and slowest computers that still
exist. A powerful, modern version of Linux can be
a completely fast and smooth experience on just 512MB of RAM. By comparison, Windows Vista required 2GB
of RAM to really run, and modern Windows versions eat up even more. Family members have old computers struggling
to breathe? Linux will let them feel like the computer
is brand new again. I will have a dedicated video on breathing
life into an old laptop very soon. It’s going to be fun. Not only that, but there’s no bloatware
or background processes that you don’t specifically ask for with Linux. That means that every time you turn it on
it will be just as fast as the last time, and there’s very minimal slowdown over time
like with Windows. Control
With Linux, you have total control over your machine. Don’t like a program? Change it. Don’t like the way something works? Change it. Don’t like what starts up with your machine? Change it! You can change and adapt just about anything. Heck, you can even roll up your own distribution
of Linux if you’d like. But all this talk of control and customizability
tends to scare people away. Your average user just wants something to
“just work,” not have to have years of programming experience to use their computer. Well – that’s also the good side of this! The biggest, by far, cause of confusion, panic,
or stress I’ve seen from computer users in all my years of tech support, helping people,
working with relatives, teaching, and so on – the biggest problem point has been when
the computer does something on its own. When you’re trying to do something on the
computer and a random pop-up shows up asking you for something you have no idea about,
or it just starts updating or doing something on its own – this isn’t really a problem
in Linux. There are certain required background processes
for a standard desktop distribution, but beyond that – you tell it to do something and it
does it, that’s it. This kind of direct control counter-intuitively
actually makes the system a lot easier to use. No more panic moments when you try to access
the internet and 3 other things start yelling at you! We’ve already covered how updates are a
much less significant issue on Linux, and all of this combines to make Linux a perfect
operating system for a basic computer user, your less tech-savvy relatives, or children. Cost
Lastly, we have the issue of cost. Many don’t take this discussion super seriously
because they never had to pay for Windows. It comes on pre-built computers, the upgrade
to Windows 10 was free for most, and so on. Why would the cost of the operating system
matter? Well, if you need to re-install or upgrade
someone’s computer, you may need to buy a new license. Not only that, but the paid operating system
ecosystem around Windows means that every little program is going to try to charge you. If you take your computer into some place
like Geek Squad or Easy Tech, they’ll try to get you to buy their anti-virus subscription
for like $200 a year. Or if you pay the $50 to $60 Norton subscription,
you’ll find it slows your computer down to a crawl and will only drive you nuts once
it expires. The price of all this, plus Microsoft Office
and so on, adds up quick. Not on Linux! You can get everything you need to do your
daily tasks for free, or with tools built directly into the operating system. LibreOffice and Google Docs works almost exactly
the same as Microsoft Office, and antivirus tools are free from the operating system vendor. Now, there are paid Linux Distros and paid
software for Linux. If you need or want the specific thing, of
course I suggest you pay for it. And, if you find you rely heavily on a free
project, I recommend donating to them every once in a while. Free software may be free to you, but they’re
not free to make and these kinds of projects need your support. But overall – you don’t need to pay a penny. Installing a free Linux system on your relative’s
old machine is much cheaper than buying them a new PC. Overall, Linux is great, and I recommend everyone
try it out at some point in their lives. Learning and using Linux teaches you a ton
about how computers work and how software is made. It’ll make you a better and smarter person. If you want to buy a computer made for Linux,
check out our sponsor, System76. System76 is a USA-based distributor of high-quality
Linux machines designed to unleash your potential. I use my Lemur laptop running Ubuntu from
them daily – even to write this video script – and I’ve never been happier with a laptop. Check them out with the link in the video
description. If you liked the video or found it helpful,
hit that like button, and get subscribed for more awesome tech videos. I’m EposVox, here to make tech easier for
you, and I’ll see you next time.